Faculty of Law

Faculty of Law
Faculty of Law

Supreme Court clerkships for two Queen’s Law graduates

(May 19, 2017)

Julien Boudreault, Law’17, and Alex Bogach, Law'16.
Julien Boudreault, Law’17, and Alex Bogach, Law'16.

While every year sees a number of Queen’s Law graduates take on positions in the nation’s capital, two Queen’s Law graduates will benefit from a truly unique opportunity in Canada’s highest court in 2018. Alex Bogach, Law’16, currently articling at Torys, will clerk for Supreme Court of Canada Justice Clément Gascon while Julien Boudreault, Law’17, who completed the civil law/common law joint degree program, will clerk for Supreme Court of Canada Justice Suzanne Côté.

The Supreme Court is famous for its collegial and close-knit work environment and both graduates are eager to experience it. “I am especially looking forward to discussing some of the most challenging and important legal issues of the day with Justice Côté and with all the other law clerks working on the same cases,” explains Boudreault. “I am excited to establish those bonds and connections as I work alongside fellow clerks from across the country,” adds Bogach.

“The interview was a short but unforgettable experience since I got the chance to discuss some very interesting legal issues with two Supreme Court judges, in a rather informal setting,” says Boudreault, who describes the application process as a sneak peak of a clerk’s future work. Bogach adds a note of thanks for all the people at Queen’s and Torys who assisted him with his application, including Dean Bill Flanagan, Professors Chris Essert and Lisa Dufraimont, and the Career Development Office. “The comments, suggestions and encouragement I received were instrumental in my application process.”

“Clerking at the Supreme Court would not be possible without the diligent professors that pushed me to think critically, a wide variety of courses that advanced my legal knowledge and, most importantly, my fellow classmates that cultivated a community of learning, teamwork and camaraderie,” Bogach continues. Boudreault, meanwhile, praises the common law/civil law program. “I am convinced that studying Canada's two major legal traditions is a significant asset for any student interested in a federal clerkship. I would add that my studies at Queen's have improved my ability to engage critically with legal doctrine and policy considerations, which will certainly prove invaluable at the Court.”