Special Applications

See Course Descriptions for pre-requisites and full course descriptions.

 

CHEE 400 – TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & MANAGEMENT (TEAM)

This is a multi-faculty consulting course that brings together students from engineering, commerce, law, and science to form a team that helps executive-level clients from large corporations solve challenging real-world problems as they work together on an 8-month project. Students work with corporations in industries such as Oil & Gas, Automotive, Alternative Energy, Biotechnology, Banking, and Consumer Goods. Companies that we have worked for include: Shell, Fluor, BASF, DuPont, Bombardier, 3M, Ontario Power Generation, Encana, Perpetual Energy, RBC and many others. Examples are available on the TEAM website.
 
TEAM places students in a results-driven environment and will provide experiences that will differentiate students from their peers. Students gain technical expertise, consulting experience, and invaluable network connections.

Enrolment

Please review the TEAM website to ensure you’re familiar with the project and what it entails. Application requirements are provided at the Chemical Engineering website
 
Space in the course is limited; the application deadline for the 2019/2020 Academic Year is June 28, 2019. Questions can be addressed to team@cheedesign.net.

 

 

BADER INTERNATIONAL STUDY CENTRE (THE CASTLE) AND EXCHANGES:

Bader International Study Centre: please see the BISC Application Procedure page.

Exchanges: please see the Exchanges – Outgoing Students page.

 

LAW 240 – LEGAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (the Colloquium)

The Colloquium in Legal and Political Philosophy (seminar, 3 credits) is scheduled during the Fall term on Mondays from 2:30 to 5:30 pm.

The Colloquium explores new work in legal and political philosophy. In previous years, our speakers and students tackled important questions like: Is there a moral right to property? Does allowing judges to review legislation on constitutional grounds undermine democracy? What justifies states' acquisition of territory? Can one be consistently both pro-choice on abortion and an ethical vegan? Does the International Criminal Court suffer from a legitimacy problem because the most powerful states are not bound by it? Do states have an obligation to rescue migrants drowning at sea?

The format is as follows: Students registered with the course meet with us to discuss a recent paper by a leading scholar. The following week, the students meet with the author, along with other faculty members and invited guests, for a workshop on the paper.

Our Fall 2019 lineup promises to engage equally important questions in legal and political philosophy – our speakers will be: Clare Chambers (Cambridge), Dale Turner (Dartmouth), Nancy Rosenblum (Harvard), Fred Schauer (Virginia), Daniel Wodak (Virginia Tech), and Larissa Katz (Toronto).

Student evaluation will be a combination of participation (40%), short reaction pieces (30%), and a term paper (30%). Participation will be evaluated by contributions during the seminar discussion in advance of the session with the author as well as engagement with the author during the session in which the author presents their paper.

Enrolment

Interested students should make known their interest by sending an email jointly to Professors Thomas and Webber (jean.thomas@queensu.ca and gregoire.webber@queensu.ca) outlining their interest in applying for the Colloquium and any relevant academic background. Please note: undergraduate or graduate studies in Philosophy or Political Studies are not prerequisites; nor is a course in legal philosophy.

In addition, in NO MORE than 250 words, please tell us how you would go about answering the question in the following scenario, taken from a paper by Jeremy Waldron.

"We are imagining people living in a state of nature, perhaps gathering together in a village or a community, and they are faced with the possibility of newcomers migrating into and proposing to settle in their vicinity. Could they be justified in driving the newcomers away—for example, by shouting threats at them, throwing rocks, or tearing up their encampments?”

Please submit your application at your earliest opportunity and in any event no later than 5 p.m. on Friday, March 8, 2019. Decisions will be communicated to applicants shortly thereafter. 

QUEEN’S LAW CLINICS (CREDIT AND SUMMER JOBS)

  • LAW 418A/B PRISON LAW CLINIC
  • LAW 419A/B ADVANCED PRISON LAW
  • LAW 438A/B QUEEN'S BUSINESS LAW CLINIC
  • LAW 527A/B QUEEN'S FAMILY LAW CLINIC
  • LAW 590A/B CLINICAL LITIGATION PRACTICE
  • LAW 591/592 QUEEN'S LEGAL AID STUDENT LEADERSHIP
  • LAW 593A/B QUEEN'S LEGAL AID STUDENT LEADERSHIP
  • LAW 695A/B ELDER LAW CLINIC

Enrolment

Applications (both summer job and credit) will be due by midnight the Thursday before Reading Week. Applications are submitted through CSM.

Each student applying will submit:

  • One application form indicating which clinics and positions they are in and their order of preference;
  • One application package for each clinic in which they are expressing interest including a cover letter (indicating if they are applying to summer job, credit, or both), a resume, and unofficial law school transcripts.

The packages will be forwarded to the Clinic directors by the Career Development office in mid-February.

Interviews for summer jobs will take place two weeks after Reading Week (so as to miss the Ottawa interview week).

Summer job offers will go out the following Monday morning, and students’ responses will be due back by noon the next day.

Credit position offers will go out in mid-March. Clinic directors will work through waitlists until all of the positions are filled and then we will advise the faculty, who will register the students for the clinic courses and for any corresponding requisites.

LAW 457 - INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW PRACTICUM (TRADELAB)

In this project-based course, which is as much a law clinic as a traditional course, students will work on actual trade law problems for real “client” beneficiaries under the supervision of their professors. The practicum offers a unique opportunity for students to gain practical experience in international trade law, while at the same time enhancing their substantive legal knowledge through participation in weekly seminars.

Enrolment

Due to the project-based nature of the course, enrolment in the course is capped at 15 students. Interested students should send a letter of motivation (approx. 300 words) explaining their interest in the course and outlining relevant experience to valerie.hughes@queensu.ca and nicolas.lamp@queensu.ca by July 8, 2019. We will fill the first ten spots on a first-come first-served basis. For the remaining five spots we will give priority to students who are currently in 2L and who have demonstrated special interest and expertise in international economic law.

MOOTING

  • LAW 473/475 AB - COMPETITIVE MOOT ORALIST
  • LAW 474 - COMPETITIVE MOOT II ORALIST
  • LAW 480/481/484 AB - COMPETITIVE MOOT COACH/RESEARCHER

Enrolment

Please see our Mooting Information for Students page.

LAW 521 - FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S LAW PLACEMENTS

Fall or Winter Term  (10 students per term)

 

3 credit graded course

 

Students in this course are placed with a lawyer or agency in the family and children’s law field, and are expected to spend 4-6 hours per week at the placement, at times that do not conflict with their classes.  Most of the placements are with lawyers, but there are also placements at the Children’s Aid Society, with the Victim Witness Program and with the Family Court Judges.  The primary focus is on learning from observation, reflection, discussion with your external supervisor, and discussion in class.  There is no scheduled class time at present, but there will be five meetings during the term of the entire class, arranged at times that do not conflict with any student’s schedule.  Students are required to keep a course log and write a short reflective piece. 

 

Prior to the start of the term, students enrolled in the course will be asked to complete a preference ballot for a specific placement and will be assigned a placement.

 

Pre or Co-requisite: Family Law

Enrolment

For Law 521 (Family Placements), interest will be a major factor in selection of students. It is not necessary to be committed to Family Law to find this a very worthwhile educational experience.

Be prepared with a statement of interest and a copy of your CV, and apply via the Career Services Manager: look for the posting "Experiential Fall or Winter Placements in Family & Criminal". Applications are due Friday, March 8 by 4 p.m.

Please feel free to contact Professor Nick Bala (bala@queensu.ca) with any questions.

 

LAW 551 - CONFLICT ANALYTICS LAB PRACTICUM 

The Conflict Analytics Practicum is a project-based course jointly offered with Smith School of Business Masters in Artificial Intelligence program. The practicum is a forum for lawyers, data scientists and computer scientists to collaborate and develop new technology for the legal industry (mainly, but not exclusively, for industry partners of the Conflict Analytics Lab). Participants will act as either project leaders or analysts. At this stage, the Lab has identified discrete tech projects in the following fields: employment (calculation of severance and determination of worker status); insurance (calculation of non-pecuniary damages); dispute settlement (an intelligent negotiation system for law firms); trademark (risk-of-confusion assessment); and customer disputes (determination of customer compensation).

Enrolment

Applications for the Practicum will be accepted by samuel.dahan@queensu.ca and natalie.henne@queensu.ca no later than 5pm on Wednesday, July 31st. Interested students should communicate their interest, as well as any relevant experience in 300 words or less. Please indicate whether you would like to enroll in the Practicum for the Fall/Winter Semester, or for the full year. 

Please note there will be 15 spots available for each semester.

The Conflict Analytics Lab also welcomes interested 1Ls to participate on a volunteer basis.

 

LAW 578-579A/B - CANADIAN JOURNAL OF COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

The Canadian Journal of Commercial Arbitration is Canada’s only scholarly refereed law review focusing on arbitration: international and domestic, commercial and investor-state. It is a collaborative publication of Queen’s Law and JURIS Publishing. The Managing Editor is Professor Joshua Karton.

Enrolment

The student editorial group is selected in the spring for the following academic year, on the basis of written applications and an interview. For further details, contact professor Joshua Karton (joshua.karton@queensu.ca).

LAW 581-582A/B - CANADIAN LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW JOURNAL

The Canadian Labour and Employment Law Journal (CLELJ) is Canada’s only scholarly refereed law review in its field, and is a collaborative publication of Lancaster House and the Queen’s Centre for Law in the Contemporary Workplace. The Editor-in-Chief is Professor Kevin Banks.

Enrolment

The student editorial group is selected in the spring for the following academic year, on the basis of written applications, a short editing test and an interview. For further details, contact professor Kevin Banks (banksk@queensu.ca).

LAW 587-589 QUEEN'S LAW JOURNAL

The Queen’s Law Journal is a practical-skills course that gives students in 2L and 3L the opportunity to be involved in publishing one of Canada’s leading legal journals. Students will have the opportunity to develop and advance their editing and writing skills as well as critically analyze submitted materials and comment upon the latest in legal scholarship.

The Journal is looking for students who have (1) an interest in and enthusiasm for the Queen’s Law Journal; and (2) strong writing, editing, and analytical skills, evidenced by a well-written cover letter and successfully completed editing and/or submissions assignment(s). Previous Board or Volunteer experience with the Journal, or other editorial or research experience, is an asset but it is not required. Many editors join the Editorial Board without such prior experience.

Enrolment

A full list (including descriptions) of all Editorial Board positions is available in the application materials. The application materials, including instructions, can be found at the following link:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1vKruS_L7wyTIHcwa-tsoF8bW0rBPoifa?usp=sharing

Applications are due by 5:00PM on Saturday, March 9th. Please submit applications via e-mail to Ryan Mullins and Levent Karademir at: ryan.mullins@queensu.ca  and levent.karademir@queensu.ca. Please feel free to contact us should you have any questions about the application process!

LAW 698 - CLINICAL EXTERNSHIP (COMMUNITY LEGAL ADVOCACY CENTRE, BELLVILLE OR COBOURG COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTRE)

A placement with a community legal clinic affiliated with and funded by Legal Aid Ontario which provides legal assistance to low-income area residents. The placement provides clinical legal experience to law students, helping them develop skill and confidence as legal professionals. Under close supervision by clinic lawyers, law students interview and counsel clients, research legal issues, draft legal memoranda, provide legal opinions, prepare pleadings, negotiate settlements and participate in hearings before administrative tribunals on poverty law issues such as landlord/tenant disputes, creditor/debtor matters, employment claims and income maintenance problems.

Enrolment

Enrolment processes are still under development. Please see CSM for current processes, and consult the Career Development Office for further details.

LAW 699 - FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIP

Queen’s Law offers upper-year students the opportunity to complete unpaid internships for three academic credits with federal government offices through Department of Justice Legal Services. Each intern is expected to work approximately 84-100 hours during the term. The hours and days of work are negotiated with the department, but interns are generally expected to spend one full business day each week in the Ottawa office. Although some additional research may be conducted from Kingston, you must be able to commit to weekly travel to Ottawa. Upon completion of the internship, the faculty will provide a maximum stipend of $1000 to help offset the costs of commuting to Ottawa. 

In addition to the internships arranged by Queen's Law, individual students may make their own arrangements with a federal government department that will qualify as an internship for credit. Such a placement would have to be approved by the Faculty prior to the start date. Internships for credit are only possible during the academic year. If you are interested in arranging your own internship, please contact the Director of Career Development before proceeding.

Enrolment

Please complete the following steps:

  1. Complete the Application for Secret Security Clearance at "secret" level. The clearance process takes a minimum of three months and sometimes longer. Print and bring all original, signed forms to the Career Development Office. Follow instructions carefully and do not leave any gaps in your dates.
     
  2. Complete the Experiential Learning Application Form in the Career Services Manager


Complete the application form in CSM under “My Account – Experiential Learning”. You will need to provide the following information:

  • Top three choices for departments to intern with
  • Term(s) you wish to complete your internship
  • Languages spoken fluently
  • Explanation of Interest for a DoJ internship and your top three departments in particular
  • Resume

Complete applications will be processed and your resume and statement of interest provided to your top three departments. The departments will determine who may be placed with them, but they will not conduct interviews. Successful applicants will be put in touch with the relevant government department and advised of the steps necessary to receive credit for the internship.